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By JESSE GRAHAM

IT’S arguably one of the most difficult questions when it comes to a wedding – is smaller or bigger better? The question has a myriad of questions that come up alongside it, about the cost of the event, how close someone has to be to earn an invitation and whether or not to have a sitting or a cocktail-style evening.
But there are pros and cons to bigger and smaller-styled weddings.
Larger weddings mean variety, and a larger group of friends and family that can come along for the big day, as well as plenty of room for a band without cramping the space.
Meanwhile, smaller events create more intimate spaces and can mean events feel closer than ones where you can get lost in the crowd – and may be lighter on the couple’s purse and wallet.
As far as numbers go, a large wedding space can mean a turnout of over 200, while smaller weddings can have around 50 attendees. Healesville’s Cameron McKenzie, who was married at Coldstream’s Riverstone Estate, said the size of a wedding came down to the personality of the bride and the groom – and that it was a decision not to be taken lightly.
“Go big or small, but make sure it’s what you want, and that you are not catering to other parties or interests – you only get one,” he said.
He said that his wedding to Michelle last year at the estate had a guest list of 85 people, and that having the event at a winery meant the atmosphere was spacious and relaxed.
Mr McKenzie said it was best to start small, and personalise the guest list according to the couple’s preferences, though money was a consideration.
When it comes to costs, it’s important for couples to shop around for venues – visiting venues when there is a wedding on and asking plenty of questions can help to create a space that is perfect for each individual couple.

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